Someone sent me a copy of the most recent Ancient Times, Published by The Company of Fifers & Drummers,. Inc., Winter 2012 Issue 135. . . smaller than I remember it.  Am I the only one to miss the center page-spread of photos?  I think most of us would turn to that first to see what’s going on and who’s making it happen (especially since there are only 3 events listed in the calendar). . .only nine-and-a-half fifers and drummers at Jaybird Day 2011? ? ?. . .but I am reminded it’s the quality, not the quantity that counts! . . . I see the First Michigan bypassed the calendar in favor of that impressive full-page ad. . .  lots of pages all about the Downfall. . . in case you haven’t already seen it on his website, it’s a nice piece of work by Robin Engleman. . . a couple of pages on Gettysburg, where the reenactors take a break from history to indulge in a kick-ass jollification, a custom borrowed from their Ancient cousins. . .

Here’s a good place to talk., the Art of the Jollification.  Is it an Ancient custom?  I am thinking of the “rummy parade” that followed the exhibitions and field days of the 19th century, and I want to say “yes indeed, it’s an Ancient thing.”  But musicians everywhere since time immemorial must have felt the need to congregate and share tunes.  What makes the jollification different than a jazz drummer’s jam or the Irish whistler’s session?  Your thoughts, please.